Comment

Survey Participants Needed: Perceptions of Recreational Angling Images 

Survey Participants Needed: Perceptions of Recreational Angling Images 

thumbnail_Fishing from Boat.jpg

From our friends at the University of Massachusetts Amherst:

We are researchers from the University of Massachusetts Amherst conducting a survey on how recreational anglers perceive images depicting a catch-and-release angling event as well as their opinions about catch-and-release practices. We have a brief survey that will take about 10-15 minutes to complete. 

You may participate in this study if you are a recreational angler or guide over the age of 18. Your participation is completely voluntary. Participants will be eligible to enter into a lottery drawing to win a Patagonia Stormfront Roll Top Pack (retail value, $149). 

If you have any questions about the research prior to taking the survey, please contact Meaghan Guckian, at mguckian@umass.edu. 

If you would like to participate in the survey, please click here or on the link below and you will be directed to the informed consent page of the survey. 

thumbnail_Fishing from the Beach.jpg

Comment

Comment

At A Glance- Blog Content

ATGlance.jpg

Click any thumbnail image to see full article.

Comment

Comment

KWF at the EWF

It was a pleasure and honor for Keepemwet Fishing to be invited to participate in the Experience the World of Fly fishing in 2019.  The goal of our organization is to minimize the impact of catch & release angling on recreational fisheries by uniting conscientious anglers, organizations and companies to promote science based practices for handling fish that are released.  Representing Keepemwet Fishing at EWF was Dr. Andy Danylchuk (Science Advisor) and Daniel Göz (Ambassador).  Our booth acted as a hub for discussions about principles and tips for ensuring fish are released in the best condition possible.  We gave away over 1500 Keepemwet pins, and hundreds of stickers that will remind anglers of what to do the next time they handle and release fish.  Daniel and Andy also gave a seminar on both days of EWF that provided insights into how to take ‘fish friendly’ photos, as well as the scientific rationale behind these techniques.  We were very encouraged by how much participants of EWF were interested in Keepemwet Fishing and are already looking forward to attending again in 2020.

The Keepemwet movement is coming to Europe, to the EWF fair. The science advisor, Dr. Andy Danylchuk, will represent Keepemwet Fishing in Fuerstendfeldbruck. Andy is a leading scientist in the field of fish handling practices in sport fishing and fly fishing. He is a professor at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. European Ambassador of Keepemwet, Daniel Göz, will represent Keepemwet Fishing together with Andy.

 Keepemwet Fishing is about releasing fish in the best condition possible.  Keepemwet believes that recreational anglers are a key components of fish conservation and that science-based approaches can help create healthier fisheries.  Andy and Daniel will answer all your question regarding better fish photography and fish handling as part of the special exhibition on the ethics of fishing.

Highlight will be their presentation “better fish photography & better fish handling”on Saturday, April 6 at 15:45 in room S1 and Sunday, April 7at 13:00 in room S1. Daniel will start the presentation revealing his secrets for better fly fishing and fish photography. Andy will talk about the newest findings regarding fish handling filled with many principles and tips on best fishing practices. Questions and interactions will be welcomed!  They will also have a booth at the fair.  Visit www.erlebniswelt-fliegenfischen.de for more information.  


DR. ANDY DANYLCHUK

SCIENCE ADVISOR - Keepemwet fishing

From tagging Giant Trevally on the scorching salt flats of Alphonse Island to taking blood samples from Golden Dorado in the dense jungle of Argentina, Dr. Andy Danylchuk is on a personal crusade to understand and conserve fish across the planet.  Equal parts scientist and fish bum, Andy is driven by an unrelenting desire to mitigate society’s impact on fish and their essential habitat.

As a professor of fish conservation at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, Andy focuses his research on the development and implementation of best practices for handling and releasing fish.  

With one foot firmly planted in the research world and the other in wading boots, Andy works to bridge the information gap between the fishing industry, conservation organizations, the scientific community, and anglers.  This focus has enabled Andy to take on roles such as Ambassador for Patagonia, Thomas & Thomas Fly Rods, and Sight Line Provisions, as well as Research Fellow for Bonefish & Tarpon Trust, board member for Indifly, Member of the Scientific Advisory Panel for the International Game Fish Association, and member of the Science and Policy Committee for the American Fly Fishing Trade Association.


DANIEL GÖZ

AMBASSADOR - Keepemwet fishing
Daniel is an experienced and successful outdoor filmmaker, a seasoned cinematographer, director of photography, director, producer, editor, cameraman, multi award-winning for human-led as well as wildlife-led outdoor and documentary work producing small scale to large scale content.

 

He is capable to produce iconic and stunning visuals through technically innovative approaches. His fortes are challenging underwater works be it oceanic or riverine, shooting and filming rare billfish species, incl. large free-swimming blue marlin and yellowfin tuna. His has further filmed the entire spawning act of Atlantic salmon and European lake trout underwater. 

 

Some of his film works are the legendary flyfishing film "Tapâm" produced with Danish Jan Bach Kristensen, where both venture off the beaten path to catch giant tarpon from their float tubes. Other works include stills and film work on the Gaula River in Norway. Daniel was also involved in one of Animal Planet's most successful River Monster episode with presenter Jeremy Wade, in which presenter Jeremy chases giant tarpon.

 

Beside his film and still work, Daniel holds an M.Sc. in geography/hydrology. He does camera based monitoring on rare trout species, using the trout's spots as bio markers to identify trout individually. His monitoring work is totally stress-free to the fish. 

Daniel is often amazed how anglers react to his images; many say they didn't know how beautiful fish look underwater! Daniel, being an angler, fish conservationist and environmentalist, is super proud to support the keepemwet movement with his knowledge and stunning visuals.


Keepemwet Fishing  auf der EWF 2019

Zum ersten Mal treffen Sie die Keepemwet Fishing Bewegung aus USA auf der EWF, vertreten durch ihren Gründer Dr. Andy Danylchuk, einen führenden Fischbiologen und Professor an der University of Massachusetts Amherst und Daniel Göz als Keepemwet Repräsentant für Europa. 


Keepemwet setzt sich mit dem schonenden Umgang von Fischen auseinander in der Sportfischerei und insbesondere im Fliegenfischen.

Keepemwet Fishing treffen Sie auf der Sonderausstellung „Ethik in der Angelfischerei“ an.  Andy und Daniel werden alle Ihre Fragen beantworten rund um bessereFischfotografie sowie den bestmöglichen Umgang mit dem Fisch.

Highlight wird der gemeinsame Vortrag bilden jeweils am Samstag und am Sonntag über „Bessere Fischfotografie und schonender Umgang mit dem Fisch“ mitanschließender Fragerunde. Daniel wird den Vortrag beginnen mit vielen Tipps rund um die Fliegenfischen Fotografie, sowie man am besten Fische unterwasser fotografierenkann. Andy wird die neuesten Erkenntnisse aus der Forschung wiedergeben ebenfallsmit vielen Tipps für den optimalen Umgang mit dem Fisch. Fragen und spannendeDiskussionen sind willkommen!
Bitte entnehmen Sie die genauen Vortragszeiten aus dem detailliertenVortragsprogramm. www.erlebniswelt-fliegenfischen.de


DR. ANDY DANYLCHUK

SCIENCE ADVISOR ~ Keepemwet fishing

Sei es beim Markieren von Giant Trevally auf Alphonse oder Blutproben von Golden Dorados im Urwald von Argentina zu gewinnen, Dr. Andy Danylchuk ist auf einerMission ein besseres Verständnis über die Auswirkungen der Fischerei auf Fischbestände zu erforschen.
Andy lehrt und arbeitet an der Massachusett Universität, sein Schwerpunkt sindForschungen zum Einfluss der Sportfischerei auf spezifische Fischarten und darausresultierend ihre Bestände. Daraus leitet er ein Fülle “best practices” für die Freizeitfischerei ab.
Mit einem Fuß fest im Wissenschaftsbetrieb und den anderen Fuß stets im Watschuhschafft Andy den Spagat zwischen Forschung, Industrie, Naturschutz Organisationenund Anglern. Andy ist Ambassador für Patagonia, Thomas & Thomas Fliegenruten, Sight Line Provisions, desweiteren ist er Mitglied und wissenschaftlicher Berater beiBonefish und Tarpon Trust, der IGFA sowie der American Flyfishing Trade Association.
Andy freut sich sein Wissen und seine Erkenntnisse auf der EWF weiterzugeben.


DANIEL GÖZ

AMBASSADOR - Keepemwet fishing
Daniel ist ein erfahrener und erfolgreicher outdoor Filmemacher, Cinematograf, Kameramann Produzent und Editor im Bereich Natur- und Angelproduktionen von kleinen Formaten bis hin zu großformatigen Produktionen.
Daniels Stärke ist es außergewöhnliche unterwasser Bilder zu generieren durchinnovative Herangehensweisen. Er hat seltene Hochseefische gefilmt und fotografiert, darunter der blaue Marlin und Gelbflossenthune. Desweiteren hat er die Fortpflanzungder seltenen Seeforelle sowie des Atlantischen unterwasser gefilmt. Zu seinen Arbeitengehört Tapâm, Gaula, 7° South sowie Arbeiten für Animal Planets Format “Flussmonster” mit Moderator Jeremy Wade.

Neben seiner Film- und Fototätigkeit arbeitet Daniel im Monitoring von Großsalmoniden, hierbei nutzt er das individuelle Punktmuster von Salmoniden zur eindeutigenIdentifikation. Diese Herangehensweise ist absolut stressfrei für die Fische.

Daniel ist oft erstaunt wie Angler auf seine Bilder reagieren, viele sagen sie wusstennicht wie schön Fische unter wasser seien!
Daniel ist stolz als Angler und  Naturschützer mit seinem Wissen und ungewöhnlichenBildern die Keepemwet Bewegung zu unterstützen; profitieren Sie von seinem Wissenauf der diesjährigen EWF.

Comment

Comment

Wild and Wet Winter 3/27

It’s Wednesday’s Wild and Wet Winter … a California Trout, Keepemwet Fishing and Lost Coast Outfitters initiative celebrating California’s wild winter steelhead.

M.W Steelie KEW.jpg

 Winter steelhead season is winding down here in California with many of the coastal fisheries closing in a few days and more storms on the horizon.  It’s been a great year to be a fish.  Not as fortuitous for us anglers but it’s hard to complain about having lots of water in our rivers and knowing the fish had optimal chances at a successful spawn that will ensure healthy populations for years to come.  There were a few great windows for fishing and I hope some of you got to have a moment with one of our coastal unicorns.  As winter steelhead season winds down I reflect back on this column and also hope that some of you out there have learned a few things and if nothing else it made you take a moment to think about how special our wild salmonids are and in particular, wild winter steelhead.   

The incredible journey of these fish really is a miracle of nature.  Just in the fact alone that they can so quickly change their physiology to be able to move back and forth from fresh to salt water.  That’s a pretty neat card trick and something not too many other fish can do.  Then when you think about how little we know about where they go once they are in the ocean and the types of hazards and predators they have to evade to make it back to our coastal streams.  It’s truly amazing.  Steelhead are one of the most highly adaptable fish out there with their ability to tolerate temperature variances, choices in the life history strategies they can display and ability to move back and forth from salt to fresh water ecosystems and feed in both, yet they are also very delicate when it comes to catching and handling them.    

I can admit I was pretty darn excited the first few times I caught a steelhead and the first thing on my mind once I landed them was to hoist the fish up for a big grip and grin photo to show off my epic catch to my friends and to have a great trophy to remember that fish forever.  In fact, early in my fishing career I pretty much made a living off grip and grin photos.   I’ve got books of old photos that go way back before social media.  My friends and family often tease me and say I have more old photos of fish then I do of any of my friends or family from growing up.  But as I’ve gotten more seasoned as an angler and learned more about these animals through these various scientific studies and resources like the CalTrout SOS report, the more I understand how fragile they really are.  By taking a few easy steps we can minimize harm to these fish.   

In recap, please be kind to all fish you plan on releasing.  Use barbless hooks, wet your hands before touching the fish, minimize exposure to air by keeping them in the water with their heads facing into the current, never touch their gills, squeeze them tight around their guts or grab them by the jaw and hoist them vertical out of the water.  Use fish friendly nets and don’t slap fish up onto the rocks or even into the dry grass.  Get your camera or photographer ready and take photos quickly while keeping the fish in the water or at least it’s head and most of its gills.  Release fish as quickly as possible, minimize fight times if water temps are high and or consider not fishing at all if temperatures are too high, fish are visibly spawning or flows are low and clear and the fish are vulnerable.  These are all just suggestions and the main thing is still to go out and have fun and enjoy the outdoors and our natural resources.  Thanks for tuning in. 

Michael Wier

California Trout

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

CalTrout:  to learn more about California winter run steelhead 

Keepemwet Fishing:  to learn more about Keepemwet priniciples 

Lost Coast Outfitters:  blog on many things fly fishing related


Comment

Comment

Wild and Wet Winter 3/13

It’s Wednesday’s Wild and Wet Winter … a California Trout, Keepemwet Fishing and Lost Coast Outfitters initiative celebrating California’s wild winter steelhead.

Nor Cal fishing guide John Fochetti and a white-hot slab of precious metal.

Nor Cal fishing guide John Fochetti and a white-hot slab of precious metal.

As we approach mid-March with Spring right around the corner California anglers searching for winter steelhead know their chase is about to change. Come March 31st a number of coastal tributaries will close to angling in order to protect spawning fish. On those rivers still open, anglers will likely see fewer fresh fish and an increase in the number of kelt (post-spawn steelhead on their way back to the Pacific). And, while summer steelhead are still a ways off, now might be a good time to start thinking about the impact of water temperature on caught and released steelhead. 

Last month (link to Feb 6 article) we spoke about the impact of 0, 10, and 30 seconds of air exposure on post-release behavior and survival of wild Bulkley River steelhead in British Columbia. Regardless of air exposure amounts, the Bulkley study demonstrated that water temperature was positively correlated with blood lactate. For all intents blood lactate and lactic acid (a term you probably have heard before) mean the same thing. At its simplest, a fish fighting on the end of your line produces blood lactate through anaerobic metabolism because it can’t take in enough oxygen to keep up with the demands of it’s muscles. Imagine how one might feel after sprinting 200 meters full out. After an extended fight, that steelhead is experiencing similar physiological stress. In general, as temperatures rise water carries less oxygen. So, at higher water temperatures with less oxygen we put more stress on fish, regardless if that fish had been left in the water or exposed to air. The key take away is this — a fight at high water temperatures puts more stress on a fish than a similar length fight at lower water temps. 

It’s not uncommon for summer run steelhead to encounter water temperatures of 70° F and warmer. A Humboldt State University study on California’s NF Trinity River and Mad River found that summer steelhead caught in water 46-73° F had a mortality rate of 9.6% approximately 36 hours post release. Most (83%) of those mortalities occurred at water temperatures above 70° F. Just last year the Oregon Dept of Fish and Wildlife closed sections or limited angling on the Umpqua River when temperatures rose above 70° in order to protect both Chinook and steelhead. 

So as water temperatures rise it becomes even more important to use appropriate tackle, land fish quickly, limit air exposure, and revive fish that need it prior to release. 

Join us in “optimizing the outcome of each fish we encounter” 

Link to the Bulkley study

Link to the HSU study

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

CalTrout:  to learn more about California winter run steelhead 

Keepemwet Fishing:  to learn more about Keepemwet priniciples 

Lost Coast Outfitters:  blog on many things fly fishing related

Comment

Comment

Wild and Wet Winter 3/6

It’s Wednesday’s Wild and Wet Winter … a California Trout, Keepemwet Fishing and Lost Coast Outfitters initiative celebrating California’s wild winter steelhead.

Have winter storms put a damper on your fishing lately?  Let’s be thankful we have plenty of water and the fish are able to successfully do their thing.  More water equals more fish, which is never a bad thing.  In the meantime, have a look at this great video produced by Michael Wier @mikowier and @CailforniaTrout featuring Shane Anderson @northforkstudios, Jason Hartwick @jasonhartwick and Yvon Chouinard (Patagonia).  These are great examples of guys who really care about the fish and the resources and treat every fish like the special experience it is.  

 Full Movie

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 

CalTrout:  to learn more about California winter run steelhead 

Keepemwet Fishing:  to learn more about Keepemwet priniciples 

Lost Coast Outfitters:  blog on many things fly fishing related




 

Comment

Comment

Wild and Wet Winter 2/27

It’s Wednesday’s Wild and Wet Winter … a California Trout, Keepemwet Fishing and Lost Coast Outfitters initiative celebrating California’s wild winter steelhead.

Better fish photos = better fish stewardship

IMG_1460 (1).jpg

 

What does the average fish photo look like? As you scroll down your digital feed, what do you see as representations of fishing in your angling community? How about #catchandrelease, what does that look like? Does it even matter? Ever consider these things when a fish at the end of your line?  

Social media and its representations of who we are seems to gain influence by the day. How catch-and-release is presented in media sets a standard that viewers will see, judge, and inevitably imitate.  So what if more anglers considered that their pictures contributed to this standard, to this public vision of normal? A founding pillar of the #keepemwet movement is rooted in this very question. 


It's not difficult to keep fish wet. For the most part, it requires minimal effort to take a knee at the water’s edge, to keep a netted fish in the water, or lean over the side of a boat. These are incredibly simple actions that everyone can choose to do and are easy ways to put conservation into action. 

 Next time you bring a fish to hand, consider a few questions: Is it going back to the water or headed to the BBQ? Do I really need a photo of every fish I catch? If photographing this catch, how can I set a good example? What if every person duplicated my exact behavior with this fish — how would that impact this fishery?

g6.jpg

Anglers are not part of the problem, they are part of the solution. Anglers — as stewards of our river, lakes, streams, and oceans — have the power, through their photos, to influence how others perceive these ecosystems and conservations efforts.  After all, few others have a finger on the pulse of fish populations the way anglers do.  As a community, anglers can "move the needle" on what #catchandrelease looks like and improve the outcomes for every fish they encounter. 

This article by from a decade ago outlines the role of fish photos and norms of media beautifully, and it’s closing sentences are worth considering. “The freshwater community possesses both the knowledge and passion to rouse the future stewards of these vital ecosystems. In crafting our educational and conservation messages, we should choose images as carefully as we choose words.

Here’s to your next 1,000 casts, and great photos of the fish that follows!

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 

CalTrout:  to learn more about California winter run steelhead 

Keepemwet Fishing:  to learn more about Keepemwet priniciples 

Lost Coast Outfitters:  blog on many things fly fishing related

 

 

Comment

Comment

Wild and Wet Winter 2/20

It’s Wednesday’s Wild and Wet Winter … a California Trout, Keepemwet Fishing and Lost Coast Outfitters initiative celebrating California’s wild winter steelhead.

Dump4.jpg

Californian’s have long recognized the importance of a good snow pack in meeting the state’s water demands.  We know too well the effects of multi-year, extreme drought.  With the most recent storm bringing snow levels to almost 150% of year to date norms, there are more than a few NorCal steelhead anglers thinking, “enough is enough” or at least “give us a little break”.  

 

Over the past few weeks we’ve talked about minimizing, if not eliminating, air exposure air and using the right tackle to land fish quickly and minimize stress.   A couple of other things to keep in mind: 

1) Hold fish over water and not over boats or land.   Fish are slippery creatures and can easily be dropped.   That way if dropped, it falls back into the water unharmed.

2) Carry pliers, hemos, or some other hook removal device.  We know you’re fishing barbless, and a larger size hook should be easy to pluck from a steelhead’s mouth, but something to help remove a deeply taken fly, lure or bait is essential to have on hand.  

3) Grip fish carefully: Fish have sensitive internal organs, so hold them lightly without squeezing. Avoid placing your hand over their mouth and gills as it obstructs breathing. With larger fish, grip the tail wrist with "A-Ok" finger formation and gently support the body under the front fins

4) Carefully revive fish: If a fish cannot swim away on it's own it may need reviving.  Hold its head facing upstream so that the water runs in the mouth and through the gills.

 

Here’s hoping you get some time on the river, and join us in “optimizing the outcome of each fish we encounter”

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

CalTrout:  to learn more about California winter run steelhead 

Keepemwet Fishing:  to learn more about Keepemwet priniciples 

Lost Coast Outfitters:  blog on many things fly fishing related

Comment

Comment

Wild and Wet Winter 2/13

It’s Wednesday’s Wild and Wet Winter … a California Trout, Keepemwet Fishing and Lost Coast Outfitters initiative celebrating California’s wild winter steelhead.

Mikey Wier photo

Mikey Wier photo

With the fourth or fifth major storm system of 2019 rolling thru northern California, coastal rivers are going big.  If you’re a winter steelhead angler you know the morning drill…step 1) coffee, step 2) precipitation forecast and step 3) flow forecasts.  But, if you’re on step 3) this morning you know you’re not going fishing this weekend.  Well, maybe the X River might, just might, outside chance be in marginal shape, but you know it’s iffy. So with winter steelhead on your mind and no fishing to be done,  here are some ideas to keep you busy.

1) A River’s Last Chance – available on Amazon (free for Amazon Prime members) … Shane Anderson’s compelling story about the impact of timber, weed and wine on the Eel River and the best opportunity for wild salmon and steelhead recovery on the entire West Coast.

2) Swing North - Hidden behind deep gray fog, California’s North Coast is one of the most pristine habitats in the state. But the thick redwood forests and slate green rivers were almost devastated by the impact of industry. Once hosting runs of more than a million salmon and steelhead, the annual fish counts on the Eel River now often number less than 1,000. Yet, the salmonids persist. In recent years, signs of a recovery ripple through the waters. In Swing North, fishermen Mikey Wier and Jason Hartwick hook into the growing population of wild winter run steelhead on the Eel. With appearances by Yvon Chouinard of Patagonia and Shane Anderson, director of Wild Reverence: The Wild Steelheads’ Last Stand, the two discover a river that holds hope for one of California’s great remaining wild fisheries.

3) Wild Reverence - Director Shane Anderson made a pilgrimage to the Olympic Peninsula in Washington state to the rivers he once fished as a boy. His relationship with the wild steelhead and the rivers in which they met upon taught him just how precious life can be. What was once a childhood fishing trip has evolved into a journey to find answers why his favorite fish is disappearing from the rivers and appearing on the Endangered Species list. How could this wild and beautiful creature slip toward the abyss of extinction?

WILD REVERENCE embarks on a quest to begin a movement to enact real change not only for the steelhead but for all ecosystems.

4) SOS II: Fish in Hot Water – CalTrout’s status update on threats and solutions for California salmon, steelhead and trout.  You can download the report using this link

5) KeepemWet Fishing Principles – make sure you understand the three main principles behind keeping fish wet.  Our goal is simple “improve the outcome of each fish we encounter”.  

Thanks and fingers are crossed that there’s some fishable water around the corner!

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

CalTrout:  to learn more about California winter run steelhead 

Keepemwet Fishing:  to learn more about Keepemwet priniciples 

Lost Coast Outfitters:  blog on many things fly fishing related

 

Comment

Comment

Wild and Wet Winter 2/6

It’s Wednesday’s Wild and Wet Winter … a California Trout, Keepemwet Fishing and Lost Coast Outfitters initiative celebrating California’s wild winter steelhead.

This week we take a look at recent work from BC.

BC_Stlhd_Card_Frontlr.jpg

Recreational fisheries for steelhead are primarily catch-and-release, including the famed run of the Bulkley River, BC. The success of catch-and-release as a conservation tool is based on the premise that released fish survive and do not suffer any negative consequences.

Science has shown, however, that angler behavior can have dramatic influences on the outcome of catch-and-release angling, and that research is needed that specifically focuses on wild steelhead to identify opportunities for refining handling practices to ensure the best outcomes for fish.

Work was conducted alongside volunteer anglers on the Bulkley River to study wild steelhead from Sept 2016 to April 2017. During this time, 126 wild steelhead were caught and used in one of two studies on the impacts of catch-and-release.

Summary of Results:

Fight Time and Landing Method

Fight times were 27% longer when fish were landed by tail grab compared to netting, but there were no influences of fight time on any measure of physiological or behavioral stress

Air Exposure

  • Air exposure durations of 10 seconds and 30 seconds increased reflex impairment and short-term downstream movement (both of which are indicators of stress) of steelhead

  • Fish that were not air exposed (0 seconds) did not show either of these signs of stress

Water Temperature

  • At higher water temperatures, fish show higher levels of stress

Survival

  • Deep hooking was the most common reason for steelhead mortality, but only occurred in 2.3% of fish

  • Overall steelhead survival from catch-and-release was approximately 95%

Angler Takeaways:

  • Anglers should minimize air exposure—ideally to less than 10 seconds

  • We also advise anglers to be more delicate with fish (reduce air exposure and handling) when water temperatures are warmer

More info on this summary and the complete report can be found at:

https://www.keepemwet.org/keepemwet-news-1/2018/4/2/bulkley-steelhead-catch-and-release-project

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

CalTrout: to learn more about California winter run steelhead

Keepemwet Fishing: to learn more about Keepemwet principles

Lost Coast Outfitters: blog on many things fly fishing related

Comment

1 Comment

Alphonse Island

Alphonse Island

by Sascha Clark Danylchuk

There are certain places on this planet that make my heart happy. They tend to be places with less people, more nature, long views, and warm weather (or at least visited during the summer). Some are places that have helped shaped who am I, and some are new places that I have only just discovered. These places stick to my heart and in my brain, and are revisited frequently in thought, if not in the physical sense.

My seven year old reeling in her first unassisted bonefish. Andy Danylchuk photo

My seven year old reeling in her first unassisted bonefish. Andy Danylchuk photo

Eye spy… Nick Jones photo

Eye spy… Nick Jones photo

I just returned from a trip to a newly discovered such place. Filled with prehistoric looking land animals and more abundance and diversity in the water than I have seen anywhere else, the Alphonse Group of islands in the Seychelles is wondrous, not to mention home to a plethora of my favorite fish, bonefish. Although many anglers visiting Alphonse set their sights on giant trevally (GT), Indo-Pacific permit, triggerfish, milkfish, and offshore species such as wahoo and sailfish to be caught on the fly, bonefish likely play a critical role in the ecology of the flats ecosystems in the Alphonse group, including being important prey items for GTs and other apex predators.

The animals on land are just as amazing as those in the sea at Alphonse! Sascha Clark Danylchuk photo

The animals on land are just as amazing as those in the sea at Alphonse! Sascha Clark Danylchuk photo

With this in mind, a consortium of organizations has embarked on research to better understand the recreational fisheries of Alphonse. This project is unique in that it was initiated at the behest of Blue Safari and the related Alphonse Fishing Company; an example of their dedication to conservation and sustainable recreational fisheries.

The first step in this process currently being carried out is an examination of the movements of GTs. It is not known how territorial GTs are, how far they move away from the atolls where they are commonly found, if they become “hook shy” and, if so, how long it takes for them to revert back to “normal” behavior. Having such information will help facilitate the sustainable management of GTs, and create better angling experiences for guests.

It takes a lot of help to tag a GT in a livewell. Sascha Clark Danylchuk photo

It takes a lot of help to tag a GT in a livewell. Sascha Clark Danylchuk photo

The first phase will take several years to complete, however there are already discussions about expanding these efforts to include other species, including my favorite quarry. In the meantime, Alphonse Fishing Company is embracing and teaching the Keepemwet Fishing principles. Not only can you find our information in their island fly shop and on their boats, but they also discuss best practices for handling and releasing fish in their angler briefings and presentations. As one guest commented to me, “I’ve never seen guides who care as much about the fish as the guides here”.

For updates about the research project, visit www.alphonsefishingco.com

Keepemwet Fishing info in the Alphonse Fishing Co. fly shop. Andy Danylchuk photo

Keepemwet Fishing info in the Alphonse Fishing Co. fly shop. Andy Danylchuk photo

1 Comment

Comment

Wild and Wet Winter 1/30

It’s Wednesday’s Wild and Wet Winter … a California Trout, Keepemwet Fishing and Lost Coast Outfitters initiative celebrating California’s wild winter steelhead.

thumbnail_IMG-0752.jpg

With another storm system about to roll through California, options for connecting with a wild, winter steelhead are going to be a bit limited. It will certainly be a good while before the mainstem Eel drops into shape.

So maybe this is a good time to revisit some of the science underlying keeping fish wet and the evolution of catch and release fishing.

Here’s a summary of an article written by Keepemwet Fishing Science Advisor, Dr. Andy Danylchuk.

“Fish breathe by moving water in through the mouth, over the gills and out the gill flaps (operculum). Fish like steelhead, salmon, and trout, actively pump water by a coordinated set of movements involving the mouth and operculum. Water flowing the opposite way, like when moving a fish backward, does not aid respiration.

Taking fish out of the water stops dissolved oxygen from getting into the blood via the gills. The gills are not adapted to capture oxygen from air.

After being exercised on the end of a fishing line, it is additionally stressful to a fish to take it out of the water and stop respiration. There are tricks for minimizing air exposure, like asking whoever is taking a photo to call the shots and get the angler to keep the fish in the water until the camera is ready. Work to submerge more of the opercula when taking shots of fish just out of water. That being said, the goal for ‘responsible angling’ should be to eliminate air exposure altogether.

Fish that experience considerable physiological stress due to exercise and handling can lose coordinated movements of fins and lose equilibrium. Hold the fish completely under water while pointing the head into the current. Support the fish gently and move the front hand behind the operculum to better promote respiration.

It can take hours for a fish to physiologically and physically recover from an angling event. Minimizing handling time and eliminating air exposure will greatly reduce recovery time.”

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

CalTrout: to learn more about California winter run steelhead

Keepemwet Fishing: to learn more about Keepemwet priniciples

Lost Coast Outfitters: blog on many things fly fishing related

Comment

Comment

Wild and Wet Winter 1/23

It’s Wednesday’s Wild and Wet Winter … a California Trout, Keepemwet Fishing and Lost Coast Outfitters initiative celebrating California’s wild winter steelhead.

M. Wier photo

M. Wier photo

Last week we covered some of the finer points of landing, photographing and releasing a steelhead that’s been hooked while drifting down river in a boat. This week lets discuss some of the other threats, besides recreational angling pressure, that Winter Steelhead face along their journey from fry to adult.

In 2017 California Trout released the SOS II: Fish In Hot Water report which chronicles the status of all 32 Native Salmonids in California based on the latest peer reviewed science and research. Within California, there are actually 8 different classifications of Steelhead; Central California Coast Steelhead, Central Valley Steelhead, Klamath Mountains Province Summer Steelhead, Klamath Mountains Province Winter Steelhead, Northern California Summer Steelhead, Northern California Winter Steelhead, South-Central California Coast Steelhead and Southern Steelhead. Each group of fish displays different traits and behaviors based on their habitat, there for each group is managed differently.

Within the SOS report, each classification of steelhead is given a level of concern based on a number of factors that determine their likelyhood to survive long-term without human intervention. Each of the 8 classifications for Steelhead range from Moderate, to High, to Critical in their level of concern. That means all 8 groups are in peril and have a likelihood of extirpation from their native range within the next 50 years. Some classification segments, like Southern Steelhead are on the brink of extinction and angling for those fish has not been allowed for many years. Northern California winter steelhead are in a state of long-term decline over much of their range due to land use practices that reduce habitat for juveniles, such as diversions that desiccate nursery tributaries during summer months, therefore they are listed as Moderate level of concern.

The top 3 major anthropogenic threats to winter steelhead listed in the report are:

Major Dams- Scott Dam on the Eel River blocks access to an estimated 290km (180 mi.) of potential habitat, while Matthews Dam on the Mad River blocks nearly a third of historical steelhead habitat. In addition, these dams reduce streamflow during important migration windows for adult and juvenile steelhead.

Estuary Alteration- The estuaries of the Eel and Mad Rivers and Redwood Creek have been leveed, armored with structures, drained, altered by tide gates, and converted for agricultural and rural development, greatly reducing juvenile nursery habitat. What suitable estuarine habitat remains is subject to high turbidity, poor water quality, and sedimentation from runoff.

Agriculture- In the past two decades, illegal water diversions and subsequent habitat degradation of remote headwater streams for marijuana cultivation has become perhaps the most important limiting factor for juvenile steelhead survival in natal streams.

CalTrout is currently engaged in a suite of projects directed to help recover Northern California Steelhead based out of our North Coast office in Arcata California. On the Eel River we have taken a headwaters to estuary approach to restoration. In the estuary, CalTrout is working with the Coastal Conservancy, CDFW and the Wild Lands Conservancy to do large scale restoration, restore tidal marshlands, reconnect the estuary with the sloughs and install fish friendly tide gates. Along the mainstem CalTrout has identified many migration barriers and listed them in order of priority for removal. To date we have already led efforts to remove two large barriers at Bridge Creek and Woodman creek opening up several miles of quality habitat to spawning and rearing. Along the South Fork and other tributaries CalTrout is working on flow studies to help inform regulations that would allow for better instream flows at critical times for salmonids. And in the headwaters our focus is on advocating for fish passage at Scott Dam which would allow Salmon and Steelhead back into over 180 miles of historic quality spawning and rearing habitat. CalTrout is also engaged in a large scale restoration effort on Redwood Creek which includes the restoration of Prairie Creek, and important spawning tributary and restoration of the estuary.

Protecting and restoring habitat for Winter Steelhead is an ongoing mission and CalTrout is committed to ensuring positive outcome for wild fish and helping meet recovery goals.

-M.Wier

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

CalTrout: to learn more about California winter run steelhead

Keepemwet Fishing: to learn more about Keepemwet priniciples

Lost Coast Outfitters: blog on many things fly fishing related

Comment

Comment

Wild and Wet Winter 1/16

It’s Wednesday’s Wild and Wet Winter … a CalTrout, Keepemwet Fishing and Lost Coast Outfitters initiative celebrating California’s wild winter steelhead.

Curtis Knight photo.

Curtis Knight photo.

Last week we spoke with steelhead guide Jeff Hickman about some science-based techniques for landing and photographing steelhead while wading. This week let’s discuses some ways you can land a wild steelhead from a boat and still get a great photo for the album but also keep the fish wet and happy so it has the best chance at succeeding on this incredible journey to return home and spawn.

Fishing from a drift boat or raft is an increasingly popular way to chase steelhead and trout. Landing a spunky fish from a boat is and art form in itself and there’s lots of ways It can easily go wrong. There’s also tricks that can help it be a more smooth experience for both the fish and the angler. In all scenarios there needs to be some synergy between the person rowing the boat and the angler.

If you have a trophy fish on the line and it’s getting time to bring it in, there’s a couple different ways you can go about it. First of all the it’s time to assess if there’s an easy place to pull over. Beaching the boat and having the angler jump out can be a great option if it’s an easy place to do so. Be careful getting out of the boat with a fish on the line as it can be an exciting moment for everyone. Landing a fish in knee deep slow water will often be the smoothest experience for the fish and also a great way to get a photo of the catch without taking it out of the water.

If there’s not an easy place to pull the boat to shore and carefully land the fish then the next best option will be to use a net. Not all nets are created equal. Some nets are harder on fish then others. A rubber basket typically wears less slime off the fish and there’s less chance of splitting fins then mesh. If you are going to use mesh, get the softest fabric you can find. Make sure you have a net big enough to hold the size fish you are targeting.

In many cases netting the fish would be a two man job. Often the guide or person rowing will net the fish for the angler in the front or back of the boat. This scenario however is not always possible as sometimes guides will need to stay on the sticks to keep the boat in the right position. As an angler you should always learn how to net your own fish as well so you don’t need to always rely on a second person. A good swipe from downstream of the fish or simply holding the net downstream and steering the fish into it will yield the best results. If the water temps are cold enough as they often are in winter, then it’s easiest on the fish if can play it an extra few seconds so it’s tired enough that it won’t totally thrash around once it’s in the bucket. To calm the fish down, raise the rim of the net so it’s above the water but the fish is still totally submerged. Keep it facing head first into the current. Once it’s calm you can lean over the rail of the boat or raft and gently remove the hook while the fish is in the water. If a photo is warranted, lift the fish gently trying to keep it’s gills underwater. Have the other angler or driver ready with the camera so the photo happens quickly. Or use and under water camera like a go pro. Be careful not to over tip the boat in one direction. While leaning over the rail the other boat mate or mates might need to lean the other direction to compensate for the weight balance.

What you should try to avoid is bringing the fish into a dry boat and laying it onto dry metal. If a the fish thrashes around and bashes onto the hard metal floor it can cause head trauma. Fish are used to floating in a weightless world so even slight head bumps can cause severe damage. Also if you remove the hook while the fish is in the boat and then hold it up for a photo or two that process will take a minimum of 30 seconds and usually much more. That’s too much time for a wild fish to be exposed to oxygen which can cause immediate or eventual damage to the fish. Try holding your breath from the time you take the fish out of the water as a reminder so fish intended for release are able to recover.

- M. Wier

Curits Knight Photo.

Curits Knight Photo.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

CalTrout: to learn more about California winter run steelhead

Keepemwet Fishing: to learn more about Keepemwet priniciples

Lost Coast Outfitters: blog on many things fly fishing related

Comment

Comment

Wild and Wet Winter1/9

It’s Wednesday’s Wild and Wet Winter … a CalTrout, Keepemwet Fishing and Lost Coast Outfitters initiative celebrating California’s wild winter steelhead.

.jpg

This week Jeff Hickman, Keepemwet Fishing Ambassador offers some thoughts on photographing winter steelhead.

“Taking good pictures while fly fishing can be difficult. Throw wild winter steelhead in the mix and it becomes on par with winning a Powerball jackpot. Challenging weather and challenging fish make for a tough combo. Fogged and / or a wet lens, low light and fish that are legendary for being elusive, tough to predict and rarely cooperate for a photo. That is why I love it. 

I’m an amateur cell phone photographer. It is an enjoyable side hobby for me while on the river guiding. I keep my iPhone in a Lifeproof case as it gets wet daily on the river. This compact setup fits in my chest or wader pocket and is easily accessible for me to take photos when I see the right moments. I also keep a small micro fiber towel handy to keep the lens and my glasses clean. 

My number one priority is treating and handling the fish with care and respect. This comes before getting a photo. Some fish don't want their picture taken, and I don’t force it. If they want to go or are acting defiant or stressed, I will simply let them go. If they are calm and cooperative, I will take photos until they are ready to swim free. 

When people catch steelhead they are always ecstatic. It is important to calm down and relax before handling a steelhead. Don't forget to breathe! If you are calm when handling them, they are often calm. If you are rushed and panicky so too are they. Often times putting the palm of my hand over their eyes can relax them also. 

My motto is to keep the fish submerged in clean water pointed upstream, breathing. I use a wide basket, soft rubber net. This helps me land fish sooner to minimize fatigue.  Some nets damage the fish, splitting their fins etc. This is unacceptable to me. 

It is possible to take great pictures with fish in the water or right on the surface of the water. Often times the water’s surface adds a really cool look to the photo. After all, fish look best in their natural settings.

If and when it is time to lift the fish (camera person is ready) I like to only see the eye come out of the water and only briefly, this keeps water moving through the gills. I try to focus on the fish's eye making that the main subject. I tap the shutter button very rapidly. Maybe one in 20 is in focus. It is better to do two or three quick partial lifts than holding them out of the water where they can’t breathe. 

Each fish has unique qualities. I always look for those and if possible enjoy photographing them. I also try to move the camera around and capture different angles all while rapidly tapping the shutter. Often times the photos that I like the best are ones I didn't expect to come out at all.

As a guide with a very keen interest in wild fish conservation, I take it upon myself to help educate and inform clients about the importance of keeping fish in the water. Winter steelhead populations are under pressure up and down the entire Pacific Northwest. By helping convince more folks to commit to Keepemwet Fishing fish handling best practices, I hope we can lessen the pressure on these spectacular fish.”

Jeff and his wife Kathryn are the owners and operators of Kimsquit Bay Lodge on BC’s Dean River and Fish the Swing, an Oregon based operation focused on swinging flies for summer and winter steelhead.

IMG_0610.jpg

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

CalTrout: to learn more about California winter run steelhead

Keepemwet Fishing: to learn more about Keepemwet priniciples

Lost Coast Outfitters: blog on many things fly fishing related

Comment

Comment

Wild and Wet Winter 1/2

It’s Wednesday’s Wild and Wet Winter … a CalTrout, Keepemwet Fishing and Lost Coast Outfitters initiative celebrating California’s wild winter steelhead.

Mikey Wier photo

Mikey Wier photo

A case can be made that California’s Eel River represents the best opportunity for large-scale wild winter steelhead (and Chinook salmon) recovery on the entire west coast. Once home to an annual return of 1,000,000 wild steelhead and salmon, today a return of 25,000 is considered a banner year with most recent years tallying considerably less. The Eel is a massive watershed with outstanding habitat and one of the few west coast watersheds with no hatchery threatening wild fish genetics. Projects focused on improving estuary habitat, removing numerous fish passage, and addressing large-scale dam removal will take many years, if not decades, and countless millions of dollars…all daunting, but achievable.

To learn more about CalTrout’s Eel River efforts within this stakeholder group see their recent film “Return to Abundance”.

Anglers overall are a pretty generous group offering both voices in advocacy and financial support to the many conservation organizations fighting the good fight.

One could argue that as long term conservation efforts play out, the most immediate and meaningful impact conservation minded anglers can have on wild fish recovery is to simply handle fish carefully and respectfully.

Keeping fish in the water and eliminating air exposure, not only will help minimize mortality, but limit any potential secondary impacts on spawning effectiveness and fry production. Everything we do today to benefit and protect wild fish can only help future wild fish recovery efforts.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

CalTrout: to learn more about California winter run steelhead

Keepemwet Fishing: to learn more about Keepemwet priniciples

Lost Coast Outfitters: blog on many things fly fishing related

Comment

Comment

Wild and Wet Winter 12/19

It’s Wednesday’s Wild and Wet Winter … a CalTrout, Keepemwet Fishing and Lost Coast Outfitters initiative celebrating California’s wild winter steelhead.

Fight ‘em hard, release ‘em fast!

Fight ‘em hard, release ‘em fast!

Catch and release angling is unquestionably one of the most effective conservation tools in protecting wild fish regardless of species. Over the last few weeks we’ve posted links to a few scientific studies that indicate keeping fish wet and eliminating air exposure helps minimize both fish mortality and potential sub-lethal effects including spawning effectiveness.

For those of you interested in taking your catch and release practices to the next level, here are Keepemwet Fishing’s recommended practices:

https://www.keepemwet.org/tips#keepemwet-tips

There are a couple of practices that are particularly relevant when fishing for wild winter steelhead.

wwwFight1.jpg

• Reduce Angling Duration: Play fish quickly without playing it to exhaustion. You’ll be in a better position to achieve that by matching your tackle to the targeted species. A single-handed 8-weight or a double-handed 7-weight would be a good place to start. These rods will give you better leverage especially when matched with at least 12 pound tippet although 15 or even 20 pound is preferable.

IMG_3258.jpg

• Fish Barbless Hooks: They cause less damage, are easier to remove, and minimize handling time. Of course, we all fish barbless hooks, but every now and then we get caught up in the excitement and forget to pinch down a barb.

IMG_6806.jpg

• Photograph Wet Fish: Ideally you keep the fish fully submerged. If not, keep it partially submerged or as close to the water as possible. Fully submerge a fish between pictures. Make the entire process short, and release the fish quickly.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

CalTrout: to learn more about California winter run steelhead

Keepemwet Fishing: to learn more about Keepemwet priniciples

Lost Coast Outfitters: blog on many things fly fishing related




Comment

Comment

Wild and Wet Winter 12/12

It’s Wednesday’s Wild and Wet Winter … a CalTrout, Keepemwet Fishing and Lost Coast Outfitters initiative celebrating California’s wild winter steelhead.

thumbnail_Image.png

With January approaching California anglers in search of winter steelhead begin to pay close attention to river flow and rain forecasts…all in search of the perfect window of opportunity. And, while we hope you have a chance to come tight to a fresh chromer, we also hope you’ll handle your catch carefully.

To learn more about Keepemwet Fishing principles and tips for handling fish carefully:

Last week we shared some basic scientific evidence pointing out the short term mortality rates associated with catch and release (CR) steelhead angling using bait, lures and flies. Most of the early catch and release research focused on mortality, but recent research has begun to focus on the “sublethal” impacts of catch and release. While that research is not specifically focused on steelhead, the evidence gathered on other salmonid species like Atlantic salmon makes many of us wonder about a similar impact on steelhead.

Some key findings of a Canadian Atlantic salmon study:

• CR salmon spawn at a rate similar to non-angled fish.

• Larger CR fish (over 31 inches) produced significantly fewer fry than same size non-angled fish. The same was not observed in smaller fish.

Reproductive success as measured by the number of fry produced for fish kept in the water can be 2-3X greater than fish held out of water and varies with water temperature.

Again, it’s important to recognize that genetic and regional differences between species caution us in applying these findings to other species. That being said, it does make many of us think about minimizing fight times and keeping fish in the water.

If you’re lucky enough to come across a wild winter steelhead this season, please consider keeping your fish in the water, minimize (if not eliminate) air exposure, and handle the fish carefully.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

CalTrout: to learn more about California winter run steelhead

Keepemwet Fishing: to learn more about Keepemwet priniciples

Lost Coast Outfitters: blog on many things fly fishing related

Comment

Comment

Wild and Wet Winter 12/5

It’s Wednesday’s Wild and Wet Winter … a CalTrout, Keepemwet Fishing and Lost Coast Outfitters initiative celebrating California’s wild winter steelhead.

WildWinter.jpg

High and turbid winter flows, especially during migration and spawning, make it difficult to accurately assess Northern California’s winter steelhead population. The optimistic estimate is less than 20,000 fish, a mere 10% of historic annual levels, ranging from just north of the SF Bay Area to the Oregon border.

With fewer fish and steady, if not increasing, angling pressure, it’s imperative that we learn how to handle fish carefully and minimize our angling impact on wild fish.

Odds are, if you’re a winter steelhead fly fisherman, you’re also a dedicated catch and release angler. Today there is a small but growing body of scientific research into the impact of catch and release angling not only on mortality, but also on post-release impacts on things like spawning and behavior. And, while little research to date has focused specifically on steelhead, we can extrapolate some generalities from research on other salmonids.

So a few things to keep in mind:

Releasing a steelhead and watching it swim away doesn’t necessarily mean the fish is in optimal shape. And, while that fish is likely to survive, our collective impact is not zero. It’s generally accepted in the angling community that bait is the most effective method to catch a steelhead, followed by lures which in turn are more effective than flies. It’s generally accepted in the scientific community that mortality rates for bait caught fish are higher than lure caught, which in turn are higher than fly caught fish.

A summary covering a number of steelhead mortality studies published in 2002

assumes the following mortality rates: bait 10%, lure 3% and fly 1%.

These differences are primarily driven by how frequently a fish is deeply hooked, and make sense when you think about how a fish eats a bag of roe versus takes a fly.

A recent study on British Columbia’s Bulkley River wild steelhead showed a survival rate three days post-capture at 95.5%.

This study also demonstrated that fish held out of the water for ten seconds or more

suffered impaired equilibrium and an immediate downstream movement compared

to fish kept in the water. Learn more about the research here.

If you’re lucky enough to come across a wild winter steelhead this season, please consider keeping your fish in the water, minimize (if not eliminate) air exposure, and handle the fish carefully.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

CalTrout: to learn more about California winter run steelhead

Keepemwet Fishing: to learn more about Keepemwet priniciples

Lost Coast Outfitters: blog on many things fly fishing related

Comment

Comment

Welcome to a “Wild and Wet Winter”

Keepemwet_wild_winter.jpg

Welcome to a “Wild and Wet Winter” … a CalTrout, Keepemwet Fishing and Lost Coast Outfitters initiative celebrating California’s wild winter steelhead. Our goals are to build awareness of the environmental threats and opportunities impacting sustainable population recovery, as well as, to educate the angling community on the rationale for Keepemwet fish handling practices, and to encourage anglers to follow them.

Each Wednesday through the end of the winter season, we’ll focus on one or more aspects impacting winter run steelhead. You’ll hopefully better understand the winter run life cycle and population distribution, top three threats … (major dams, estuary alteration, and agriculture), and conservation efforts ranging from the Smith to the South Fork Eel.

We’ll help you understand ways in which anglers can minimize their affect on fish. We’ll provide insight into the science supporting Keepemwet practices. You’ll understand the impact of landing time, landing practices (netting versus tailing), and barbed hooks, what happens when you take fish out of the water, how long is too long for a fish to be out of the water (and why), thoughts on ways to hold fish to minimize harm, and lastly how to take pictures that celebrate your catch while keeping fish wet.

Hopefully, we’ll help minimize fish mortality and the negative impact some practices can have on spawning efficacy.

See you next Wednesday and have a Wild and Wet Winter

CalTrout: to learn more about California winter run steelhead

Keepemwet Fishing: to learn more about Keepemwet priniciples

Lost Coast Outfitters: blog on many things fly fishing related

Comment