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Ambassador Profile: Tom Enderlin

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Tom Enderlin is a traveling waterman with a passion for environmental conservation and innovative adventure. He is based in Costa Rica, where he runs a boutique fly fishing outfitter called Release Fly Travel. Programs around the country include pelagics in the Pacific, rainbow trout in the highlands, exotic species like machaca and guapote in various lowland rivers, and the stand-out program, the Jungle Tarpon Reserve.

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At the Jungle Tarpon Reserve, Tom has worked extensively with the local community to help create a community-based fly fishing tourism initiative. Tom has led training workshops in guiding and hosting travelers, collaborated in scientific research projects, influenced local regulations pertaining to tarpon fishing, held tree plantings and river cleanups, amongst other projects. One of the most impactful components of the new regulations Tom helped bring into fruition was that angler’s are not allowed to remove more then 30% of a captured tarpon’s body from the water. This means no dragging fish onto the boat for hero shots, and many a client from around the world has taken the “jungle plunge” in order hold a big silver king prior to release. Tom and his local team truly care about these tarpon, and they are constantly looking for ways to make a positive impact in the region in order to keep the destination sustainable both environmentally and culturally. Check out Castaway Films’ 2018 release of Atlanticus to see the Jungle Tarpon Reserve’s natural beauty and the raw power of the area’s tarpon for yourself.

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To compliment whats being done, Tom founded Conservación Bosque del Sábalo, or Jungle Tarpon Conservation, a Costa Rican non-profit organization whose mission is to conserve a globally unique freshwater tarpon habitat in the Caribbean watersheds of Northern Costa Rica by implementing environmental stewardship, community awareness and education, enhanced scientific understanding, and the creation of sustainable economic opportunities.

When not traveling Tom calls a small organic farm in the mountains of Costa Rica home, where he lives with his wife, son, dogs, a flock of unruly chickens, and an extensive tropical garden.

Instagram @releaseflytravel

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KWF to Host Panel Discuaaion at ICAST/IFTD in Orlando

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The Branding of Catch-and-Release

The rise of social media and smartphones has made the days of anglers telling tales and exaggerating the size of their catch all but obsolete.  While this might mean that anglers are now more honest people, what does it mean for fish intended for release? Does it matter what fish photos ‘look’ like? Is it time to reevaluate the traditional hero shot?  What role does the industry play? 
 

Please join us for a discussion at IFTD on Thursday, July 12 from 1:30 - 2:30


Join panel members Brian O’Keefe, Jako Lucas, Jennifer Lavigne, Mark Harbaugh, Dr. Aaron Adams, Capt. Tony DiGiulian, Dr. Jake Brownscombe, Sascha Clark Danylchuk, Dr. Andy Danylchuk, and Bryan Huskey as we discuss the branding of catch-and-release.

Feel free to pass this invitation along to others attending IFTD/ICAST who may be interested in joining the conversation.

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Ambassador Profile: Daniel Goez

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German Daniel Göz was born and raised in France. He has a base in Frankfurt/Germany, but resides in both countries.

Daniel is an experienced and successful outdoor filmmaker, a seasoned cinematographer, director of photography, director, producer, editor, cameraman, multi award-winning for human-led as well as wildlife-led outdoor and documentary work producing small scale to large scale content.

He has worked in very remote locations and harsh conditions such as the strenuous climates of the Central American jungle to freezing climates of the North producing rare images in all these adverse conditions.

He is capable to produce iconic and stunning visuals through technically innovative approaches. His fortes are challenging underwater works be it oceanic or riverine, shooting and filming rare billfish species, incl. large free-swimming blue marlin and yellowfin tuna. His has further filmed the entire spawning act of Atlantic salmon and European lake trout underwater. His underwater photography spans well over a decade.
Some of his film works are the legendary flyfishing film "Tapâm" produced with Danish Jan Bach Kristensen, where both venture off the beaten path to catch giant tarpon from their float tubes. Other works include stills and film work on the Gaula River in Norway. Daniel was also involved in one of Animal Planet's most successful River Monster episode with presenter Jeremy Wade, in which Jeremy chases giant tarpon.

Beside his film and still work, Daniel holds an M.Sc. in geography/hydrology. He does camera based monitoring on rare trout species, using the trout's spots as bio markers to identify trout individually. His monitoring work is totally stress-free to the fish. 
Fun fact: Daniel is president of the fishery's guild in Frankfurt which was founded 945 ad. He takes care of all fish ecological aspects of the large Main River in Frankfurt.

Daniel is often amazed how anglers react to his images; many say they didn't know how beautiful fish look underwater. Daniel, being an angler, fish conservationist and environmentalist, is super proud to support the keepemwet movement with his knowledge and stunning visuals.

http://danielgoez.com

http://www.tapamthemovie.com

https://vimeo.com/user4502703

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http://danielgoez.com

http://www.tapamthemovie.com

https://vimeo.com/user4502703

 

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Catch Magazine- A MOBILE VIEW featuring KWF Ambassador Team

Our longtime friends at Catch Magazine have consistently produced the highest quality digital publication for many years now. And when it comes to representations of best case handling of fish that are released, they absolutely get it!

It's awesome to have our own feature article "A MOBILE VIEW" which can be found in the  April/May 2018 issue. If you don't already subscribe to Catch Magazine but can't get enough of the greatest fishing adventures on the planet, you're missing out!

Enjoy this excerpt from issue #56 with photo and C&R handling tips from our own Keepemwet Fishing staff and Ambassadors!

 Make sure you have enough phone storage before you get on the river. Erase photos you don’t want. I’ve been in the middle of taking photos and received a message saying storage full.  Photo by Marty Sheppard, KWF Ambassador.

Make sure you have enough phone storage before you get on the river. Erase photos you don’t want. I’ve been in the middle of taking photos and received a message saying storage full. 
Photo by Marty Sheppard, KWF Ambassador.

  Photo by Dr. Aaron Adams, KWF Science Ambassador.

Photo by Dr. Aaron Adams, KWF Science Ambassador.

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  Left - 3. Use the video mode for lens option different than photo mode and the ability to capture more of the experience then simply save the best still frames from the video!    Photo by Sascha Clark Danylchuk, KWF Operations/Science Liaison.    Right - 4. A common misconception about Keepemwet is a perceived opposition or conflict with grip and grin photos. While we work to raise awareness of the impacts surrounding various handling practices, it's a no-brainer to handle fish with care and get great photos too. My better half Ali demonstrates with ease on a cool October day last fall.    Photo by Bryan Huskey

Left - 3. Use the video mode for lens option different than photo mode and the ability to capture more of the experience then simply save the best still frames from the video! 
Photo by Sascha Clark Danylchuk, KWF Operations/Science Liaison. 
Right - 4. A common misconception about Keepemwet is a perceived opposition or conflict with grip and grin photos. While we work to raise awareness of the impacts surrounding various handling practices, it's a no-brainer to handle fish with care and get great photos too. My better half Ali demonstrates with ease on a cool October day last fall. 
Photo by Bryan Huskey

     Captain Rob Kramarz holding a Permit in the Florida Keys. This fish was caught as part of a Bonefish and Tarpon Trust tracking study led by Jake Brownscombe aimed at understand habitat connectivity in the region. The visible dart tag is used for individual identification in case of recapture, while an internally implanted acoustic tag transmits a unique signal that is used for spatial tracking.    Photo by Dr. Jake Brownscombe, KWF Science Ambassador.

 

Captain Rob Kramarz holding a Permit in the Florida Keys. This fish was caught as part of a Bonefish and Tarpon Trust tracking study led by Jake Brownscombe aimed at understand habitat connectivity in the region. The visible dart tag is used for individual identification in case of recapture, while an internally implanted acoustic tag transmits a unique signal that is used for spatial tracking. 
Photo by Dr. Jake Brownscombe, KWF Science Ambassador.

  This is the most air he saw, and it was only for a quick second. I tell people to hold the fish completely under the water and just lift it enough so I can see it's eye. Only takes a second or two and I shoot as many photos as I can, rapid fire. One usually turns out crisp.    Photo by Jeff Hickman, KWF Ambassador.

This is the most air he saw, and it was only for a quick second. I tell people to hold the fish completely under the water and just lift it enough so I can see it's eye. Only takes a second or two and I shoot as many photos as I can, rapid fire. One usually turns out crisp. 
Photo by Jeff Hickman, KWF Ambassador.

  Photo by Dr. Aaron Adams, KWF Science Ambassador.

Photo by Dr. Aaron Adams, KWF Science Ambassador.

  Photo by Marty Sheppard, KWF Ambassador.

Photo by Marty Sheppard, KWF Ambassador.

 Left - Nets allow the fish to recover IN THE WATER while you compose shots. Gentle a-okay grip around the wrist of the tail with non camera hand can point and steer the fish angle and direction. Keep the head in the water and use the net to support the fish for various positions at water level.  Photo by Bryan Huskey  Right - Take lots of photos in seconds by holding the button down. Get as many photos as you can fast.   Photo by Marty Sheppard, KWF Ambassador.

Left - Nets allow the fish to recover IN THE WATER while you compose shots. Gentle a-okay grip around the wrist of the tail with non camera hand can point and steer the fish angle and direction. Keep the head in the water and use the net to support the fish for various positions at water level. 
Photo by Bryan Huskey
Right - Take lots of photos in seconds by holding the button down. Get as many photos as you can fast.  
Photo by Marty Sheppard, KWF Ambassador.

 Blue Marlin: Two time Stanley Cup Champion, Tofino Resort and Marina owner and Keepemwet supporter, Willie Mitchell releases his first Blue Marlin in Abaco, Bahamas.  Photo by Keepemwet Fishing Ambassador Captain Tony DiGiulian.

Blue Marlin: Two time Stanley Cup Champion, Tofino Resort and Marina owner and Keepemwet supporter, Willie Mitchell releases his first Blue Marlin in Abaco, Bahamas. 
Photo by Keepemwet Fishing Ambassador Captain Tony DiGiulian.

  Keepemwet Ambassador Anthony DiGiulian releases a sailfish with IGFA President Nehl Horton. Leaders lead by example, 24/7 and 365 days a year.

Keepemwet Ambassador Anthony DiGiulian releases a sailfish with IGFA President Nehl Horton. Leaders lead by example, 24/7 and 365 days a year.

  Known as the "fish who can stop dam construction," "fish of a thousand casts," "cousin of Taimen, our king of the streams Hucho hucho (Danube salmon)"... Take a snap, release it and you will have the lifelong memory of your fish of a lifetime.   Photograph by Uroš Kristan, KWF Ambassador.

Known as the "fish who can stop dam construction," "fish of a thousand casts," "cousin of Taimen, our king of the streams Hucho hucho (Danube salmon)"... Take a snap, release it and you will have the lifelong memory of your fish of a lifetime.
Photograph by Uroš Kristan, KWF Ambassador.

 Sometimes you find big things in small details, even if it just sun coming through a dorsal fin of a nice brown trout. Photograph by Uroš Kristan, KWF Ambassador.

Sometimes you find big things in small details, even if it just sun coming through a dorsal fin of a nice brown trout.
Photograph by Uroš Kristan, KWF Ambassador.

  Nice example of pure Danubian strain brown trout from the Obrh River... they fight hard to push out the introduced Atlantic strain of brown trout from our rivers.    Photograph by Uroš Kristan, KWF Ambassador.

Nice example of pure Danubian strain brown trout from the Obrh River... they fight hard to push out the introduced Atlantic strain of brown trout from our rivers. 
Photograph by Uroš Kristan, KWF Ambassador.

  Not equally loved around the planet, but really important for the fly fishing community here in Slovenia, this trophy grayling "Lady of the Stream", was caught and released in early spring on the Iščica River.    Photograph by Uroš Kristan, KWF Ambassador.

Not equally loved around the planet, but really important for the fly fishing community here in Slovenia, this trophy grayling "Lady of the Stream", was caught and released in early spring on the Iščica River. 
Photograph by Uroš Kristan, KWF Ambassador.

  Here's a wild rainbow trout buck from the Idrijca River. They are almost native now, but at the same time totally alien ... future unknown?!    Photograph by Uroš Kristan, KWF Ambassador.

Here's a wild rainbow trout buck from the Idrijca River. They are almost native now, but at the same time totally alien ... future unknown?! 
Photograph by Uroš Kristan, KWF Ambassador.

 Here's a baby marble trout from the emerald daughter of mountains, the Soča (Isonzo) River . Please #keepemwet and Catch & Release for generations to come. About the net - This amazing "floating" landing net was a game changer and a clever simple design/innovation from a man who is a total fly fishing enthusiast. His name is Glen Pointon from England, and the name of the  net is  Glen Pointon Living The Dream Catch and Release Net .  Photograph by Uroš Kristan, KWF Ambassador.

Here's a baby marble trout from the emerald daughter of mountains, the Soča (Isonzo) River . Please #keepemwet and Catch & Release for generations to come.
About the net - This amazing "floating" landing net was a game changer and a clever simple design/innovation from a man who is a total fly fishing enthusiast. His name is Glen Pointon from England, and the name of the
net is Glen Pointon Living The Dream Catch and Release Net
Photograph by Uroš Kristan, KWF Ambassador.

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AFFTA Fisheries Fund Awards Grant to Keepemwet Fishing

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Keepemwet Fishing is about releasing fish in the best condition possible.  We believe that recreational anglers are a key component of fish conservation, and that science-based approaches can help create healthier fisheries.  Our education campaign provides anglers with easy to use principles and tips that help create the best outcomes for fish that are caught-and-released.  

“The grants we have received from the AFFTA Fisheries Fund have allowed us to reach a greater audience through our education campaign on the best handling practices for catch-and-release.  We couldn’t have done it without the help of AFFTA.” Sascha Clark Danylchuk, Operations at Keepemwet Fishing.

We thank AFFTA and the Fisheries Fund for another year of support for our work!

 

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It's Not Just the Catch - June Contest by Loon

Congratulations Connor R! The folks at Loon Outdoors have selected your image as winner for this round of  It's Not Just the Catch. Get stoked for the assembly of prize items that will be heading your way and thanks to all who have taken time to describe and share what they love and appreciate about clean water and healthy fisheries.

  Trout Lake Siesta. The location is under a tree next to Trout Lake in Yellowstone National Park. After a nice hike up to Trout Lake with my wife and three month old daughter, it was time for a relaxing nap in the shade overlooking this beautiful view.    We set up the eno, had a bite to eat and rested up before heading down to the lake to try our luck with the native Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout! The nap extended our day trip up at the Lake and was well worth the hike!

Trout Lake Siesta. The location is under a tree next to Trout Lake in Yellowstone National Park. After a nice hike up to Trout Lake with my wife and three month old daughter, it was time for a relaxing nap in the shade overlooking this beautiful view.

We set up the eno, had a bite to eat and rested up before heading down to the lake to try our luck with the native Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout! The nap extended our day trip up at the Lake and was well worth the hike!

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We are stoked to continue our photo contest that deemphasizes photographing and posting every fish that's landed. Instead, we want to see the greatest parts of your time on the water that wasn't the catch. 

For the rest of June, show us your best images of what clean water provides for you. It could be quenching your thirst right from a New Zealand stream, an epic hatch on your favorite trout stream, or simply gazing deep into the waters you love to fish. Show us what you love and appreciate about clean water.

 The healthy prize package courtesy of our friends at Loon Outdoors.    Fly Tying Tool Kit , Iconic Kit , Lochsa , Top Ride , Bearded Shirt , On The Swing Hat

The healthy prize package courtesy of our friends at Loon Outdoors. 

Fly Tying Tool Kit , Iconic Kit , Lochsa , Top Ride , Bearded Shirt , On The Swing Hat

To enter, email your photos along with a short description of what clean water means to you to keepemwetfishing@outlook.com. The winner will be announced via our "In the Loop" newsletter early July. We'll begin posting entries to a slide show here at the bottom of this post. Have fun out there and be grateful!

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It's Not Just the Catch - "What made you smile?"

 SMITH OPTICS get is dialed in for April, "What made you smile?"

SMITH OPTICS get is dialed in for April, "What made you smile?"

 Our friends at  Smith Optics have spoken and these are the winners of the April contest "What Makes You Smile?" Congratulations to Sabrina who wrote:    "Hi!  My name is Sabrina.  I am a disabled army veteran and am in the Project Healing Waters Fly Fishing program here in Maine.    Due to a leg injury  from the military, wading can be tough but I do not let it stop me!  I have a lab mix dog named pepper and she goes with me everywhere.  She stays right by my side in the stream...always next to me so I can hold onto her for stability if needed.    My husband captured this photo of her and I in Grand Lake Stream, ME.  Fishing for land locked salmon.     This photo of her and I warms my heart ❤️. I smile every time I look at it.  And am so lucky to have her in my life."   Enjoy your new Colette Chromapop™ Polarized sunglasses!  Men's winner Cody describes:  "Any moments like these, that I get to spend with my twins on the river, makes me smile."   He'll be rocking a new pair of Transfer shades with Chromapop™ Polarized lenses.   We're cooking up all new criteria and prizes for our May installment of "It's not  Just the CATCH" so stay tuned to the next newsletter to get the scoop!

Our friends at Smith Opticshave spoken and these are the winners of the April contest "What Makes You Smile?" Congratulations to Sabrina who wrote: 

"Hi!  My name is Sabrina.  I am a disabled army veteran and am in the Project Healing Waters Fly Fishing program here in Maine.

Due to a leg injury  from the military, wading can be tough but I do not let it stop me!  I have a lab mix dog named pepper and she goes with me everywhere.  She stays right by my side in the stream...always next to me so I can hold onto her for stability if needed.

My husband captured this photo of her and I in Grand Lake Stream, ME.  Fishing for land locked salmon. 

This photo of her and I warms my heart ❤️. I smile every time I look at it.  And am so lucky to have her in my life." 
Enjoy your new Colette Chromapop™ Polarized sunglasses!

Men's winner Cody describes:
"Any moments like these, that I get to spend with my twins on the river, makes me smile." 
He'll be rocking a new pair of Transfer shades with Chromapop™ Polarized lenses. 

We're cooking up all new criteria and prizes for our May installment of "It's not Justthe CATCH" so stay tuned to the next newsletter to get the scoop!

THIS CONTEST IS NOW CLOSED. STAY TUNED FOR WINNERS ANNOUNCED IN OUR NEWSLETTER AND UPCOMING CRITERIA AND PRIZES FOR MAY.

We are stoked to continue our photo contest that de-emphasizes the urgency to photograph and share every fish that's landed. Instead, we want to see the greatest parts of your time on the water that wasn't the catch. 

For the rest of April, we want to see what made you smile or laugh. Show us your best friends, the incredible view, that one funny shaped rock, or the bowl of chili dumped down your waders! Whatever brought smiles and laughter to your day on the water.

The April contest is sponsored by our friends at SMITH OPTICS who've generously provided a pair of sun glasses for both  men and women winners.  The selected winners will be announced via our "In the Loop" newsletter April 30th. To enter, email your photos along with a short description of what made you smile or laugh out on the water *to keepemwetfishing@outlook.com. Limit of 3 photos per person please. We'll begin posting entries to a slide show here at the bottom of this post. Pursue your thrill, have fun out there and be grateful!

 Up for grabs! Men's and women's winners will feel the love from our partners at SMITH Optics.

Up for grabs! Men's and women's winners will feel the love from our partners at SMITH Optics.

*By entering my photo(s), I consent to receive email communications from Keepemwet Fishing based on the information collected.

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It's Not Just the Catch - March Winner

Keepemwet Fishing is a movement built on the basis of how catch-and-release fish are presented in photos. Originally, in the early days of social media this caught our attention as what seemed like frantic competition of who could post the most fish photos. 

So it's no surprise that we suggest considering if photographing C&R fish should always be routine. Or at least de-emphasizing the urgency to photograph every fish that's caught and instead shift the focus to other elements that draw us outside to toss lines in the water. There are after all, so many reasons we love to fish.

Lets celebrate and explore those other reasons, and in the process take our collective eyes off glorification of the catch and give our nod to the overall holistic experience of fishing. With this in mind, we present "It's not just the Catch", a series of photo contests featuring various criteria besides the obvious. And hey it's a great way to pull off a win on those days you end up skunked! We hope you'll join us.  

AND THE MARCH WINNER IS....

From the Fishpond USA judges:

We have chosen a winner. Joseph R and his amazing hat of shame! 
Our selection process - each staff member picked a photo for the final round of voting and we picked a random winner out of a hat to make the final selection. Joseph was our winner! There were too many good options to do it any other way. Thank you to everyone who submitted a photo and shared their story.

 Joseph Russell, March contest Fishpond USA winner.

Joseph Russell, March contest Fishpond USA winner.

"So we fish a medium sized lake in the Adirondacks for some really decent sized pike; the average fish is in the 30” range. I know this isn’t record breaking but the remoteness of the water and the journey to and fro are what really add to the pervasive spirit of adventure when we go for a multi day trip with the boys. This photo was taken on the last day and around the journey out of camp. I am donning with pride the hat of shame. It’s an adaptation of a photo we had seen from the flying fish journal about a group of guys better than annual Alaskan steelhead trip and brought along with him a banana suit costume. The idea of the costume was a humility check for the guy who had caught the most steelhead or the biggest fish on the previous day. We decided to take it a step further and just simply award the hat to the person who caught the fewest fish, the smallest fish, or no fish at all. I am thankful he avoided the trifecta by hooking into a small hammer handle Pike on the second to last day of the trip to stave off the goose egg but still won the hat for lack of numbers and size."Joseph Russell, April contest winner. 

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It's Not Just the Catch - Gallery Page 2

Note this contest is now closed

That's right, all your entries maxed out the storage on the original page posting so this is the overflow page for our March contest "It's Not Just the Catch" presented by Fishpond USA. See entry info and the first page of entries here.

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Ambassador Profile: Adrian Gray

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Adrian Gray's passion for fishing is clearly evident in his artwork and his photography. 

The man is a perfectionist, and you won't see his artwork unless it passes a very stringent quality test. Every detail must be perfect. If every finlet, color and use of light is not absolutely without flaw, the piece won't leave the artist's easel.


With that kind of attention to detail, it takes more time to produce a final painting, but the end results are incredibly lifelike scenes that depict a magical moment of the watery hunt. While the artist may never be 100 percent happy with the final piece, the public must be because demand for Adrian's artwork and photos continues to grow.  

Born on the southeast coast of South Africa, Adrian took to surf casting for local species such as kob and “pig-nose grunters” as a kid. He credits his mother and grandfather for getting him into fishing. When his grandfather passed away, Adrian inherited his fishing rods. Those rods led to a lifelong passion for angling.

At 11, he and his family moved to New York, where the fishing was much different than South Africa. He started targeting salmon and steelhead in the New York watershed and Great Lakes. At 14 his father bought a cuddy cabin boat and Adrian took it on fishing adventures throughout Long Island Sound. He caught bluefish, fluke and striped bass.

His love of fish and the ocean led him to the University of Miami, where he studied marine biology. “I wanted to do something with fish,” he says, but he had no idea that he’d move into art and photography. 

“I would sketch and play around with pencils,” he says. “I took general art classes in high school and excelled at it, but I kind of left it and it didn’t hit again till I was 24 or 25. We caught a big swordfish and I wanted to paint it.”

Using a friend’s easel and leftover paints, Adrian put his swordfish memory on canvas. His swordfish painting quickly caught the attention of the fishing world. The Big Game Fishing Journal ran the painting on its cover and Lindgren-Pitman bought the rights to it and used it as a catalog cover. Adrian began going to tournaments and selling prints. Demand for his art began to grow. He painted when he wasn’t fishing or working, which means he didn’t paint a whole lot, but he made time for it. Then he got a camera and that took his talents in yet another direction. 

“In 2004 I started working at the IGFA and I wanted to make the magazine and newsletter better, but I had no photos,” Adrian recalls. “Whenever I approached a photographer, I hit a wall when they said, ‘What will you pay me?’ So I invested in a camera got an underwater housing.” 

He taught himself the intricacies that go along with taking tack-sharp photos of fish in their natural element, whether that was below the water or jumping behind a boat. Adrian traveled and attended fishing tournaments and fished as much as he could, always toting waterproof boxes with his camera gear. He is now considered one of the premiere photographers in the recreational fishing industry, with many magazine covers to his credit. He has a gigantic photo library with everything from freshwater species to blue marlin, but he says he does not paint photos. He only uses them for reference to help him create the scenes he conjures up in his mind. 

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His artistic style continues to evolve: “I have this perfectionist personality so I’m never satisfied,” he says. “I don’t want to show old works. They’re not an example of what my strengths are. The art develops through experimentation, growth and how you perceive things.”

With about 30 completed paintings to his credit, he is not about pumping out new paintings as fast as possible. He prefers to focus on the details rather than the end result. He started with acrylics but now paints in oils. “I like the way the oils blend,” Adrian says. “It takes longer to do. The mixing is more tedious but oils have a natural look.”

"The art develops through experimentation, growth and how you perceive things."

He’s currently working on a bluefin tuna piece inspired by a 2014 trip to Nova Scotia. “We only had two days and on the first day we went out it was unusually calm. Each of us caught our first bluefin in the 750- to 1,000-pound range,” Adrian says. “We started hand-feeding them and I jumped in. The water was cold but it was one of the best experiences of my life, swimming with something that big. They move so much water but they’re so graceful at the same time.”

Adrian, who turns 38 this year, still works for the IGFA, laying out their publications and posting on the organization’s website and social media. His phone usually goes to voicemail because he’s traveling, fishing, photographing something or in the studio painting. And lately he’s experimenting more with video. “I’m intrigued by slow-motion and and working with that type of video,” he says. “I’ll probably get more into that.” Fishing is his passion. The art and photography are his way of expressing this love of all things fishing. 
 
“My favorite thing is to jump in the water and take photos of fish.”

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It's Not Just the Catch

 Sure we hope to catch fish, but deep down it's not just the catch that fuel our imaginations.

Sure we hope to catch fish, but deep down it's not just the catch that fuel our imaginations.

Note this contest is now closed. Stay tuned for April contest.

UPDATE: WE'VE HAD SO MANY ENTRIES THERE IS NOW A SECOND PAGE AND GALLERY IN THE BLOG LOCATED HERE.

We are introducing a new photo contest that de-emphasizes the urgency to photograph and share every fish that's landed. Instead, we want to see the greatest part of your time on the water that wasn't the catch. 

For the month of March, we want to see where you fish. Show us your favorite water. No need to name names or give away secrets, there are still places the internet just doesn't need to know about! But give us a peek at the waters that draw you back.

The March contest is sponsored by our friends at Fishpond USA who are generously providing a worthy prize package. The winner will be announced via our "In the Loop" newsletter near the end of March. To enter, email your photos along with a short description of what you love about your favorite water to keepemwetfishing@outlook.com. We'll begin posting entries to a slide show here at the bottom of this post. Have fun out there and be grateful!

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Guest Perspective: David Lisi "Fishing by a Different Set of Rules"

What #keepemwet means to me.

by David Lisi

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It’s what you do when nobody’s looking. This used to be the standard to live by, but what you do when everyone is looking that matters in today’s world. Our posts on social media say a lot about the kind of anglers we are or better yet, want to be. With the boom of fly fishing on social media platforms, proper fish handling is trending, but is it all just for the photos?

The #keepemwet movement to me is more than just keeping fish wet for sexy pics. It is about adopting a fish handling practice that is fish and resource-centric which starts long before we trek to our favorite waterways.

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#Keepemwet begins with conscious choices about how you to pursue, catch, land and release fish. For me, this change in thinking has evolved over many years on the water and is an ever-evolving process. It has led me to fishing by my own set of “laws” or “self-regulation.” I believe #keepemwet is about adopting a personal set of standards that goes above the baseline regulations that guide our fishing journeys and angling practices.

I can remember crude beginnings on salmon and steelhead streams in the Great Lakes, carelessly dragging salmon ashore to later harvest or toss them back in the water. This was how everyone was fishing, I can honestly say that I didn’t know any better. The put-and-take stocking programs of the world tend to make anglers less aware of the fragility of wild and native fish. 

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It was not until I learned about the wild salmon, steelhead and trout of the pacific northwest that I became enamored by fish and their remarkable life cycles. The life cycles of salmon and steelhead are nothing short of a miracle. Whether potamodromous or anadromous, salmon and steelhead endure a life of seemingly impossible hardships.

Once I learned more about special fish like the wild salmon, steelhead and trout of the PNW, I wanted to pursue them with passion but protect them in the process. This led to a love for all fish species which has developed into my personal set of “standards” and fishing practices.

My passion for fishing led me to Alaska to pursue a career as a fishing guide. Since moving here and guiding these waterways, I have come to know anglers from all walks of life and all corners of the globe. The one thing we all have in common is a willingness to be open to understanding the resource and protect it.

Each angler goes about this in their own way. Movements like #keepemwet, #trybarblessforaday and so on, help raise awareness in our community that there is a higher standard to achieve. Not a better way to look cool while taking fishing photos, but a better way to pursue fish. To me, standard fishing regulations are merely the baseline for this pursuit.

For example, in the waters I guide in Alaska, an angler can conceivably use barbed hooks, treble hooks, harvest trout, fish for trout with bait and take most fish out of the water and so on. Though my individual choices go beyond the standards set forth by the laws, I understand that change happens slowly and open-minded anglers will gravitate to better fish handling practices.

The one thing I would caution is our approach to other anglers. The challenge is to educate without bashing fellow anglers or thinking you’re better than someone else because of the way you do things.

Though most of my fish are kept in the water and handled with the highest level of care I can manage, I still have photographic evidence of a “former angling life." I can be seen holding fish by the gills, laying them on the beach and so on. There isn’t an angler in the world that has a perfect fish handling track record.

I constantly see people bashing anglers online for poor handling techniques and picking apart their methods for pursuing fish with various different rod choices and tackle…. My plea is that we engage our fellow anglers with patience and lead by example, while at the same time realize that we have not matured into the anglers that we someday will become. 

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Yes, every fish out of water and every dry fish precariously posed for a glamour shot has me shaking my head in utter disbelief, but what puts me at ease is understanding that the growth and evolution of anglers is a personal journey. #keepemwet simply helps anglers find their path to becoming the best stewards for the resource and ambassadors for all species of fish.

David Lisi is the owner of Cooper Landing Fishing Guide, LLC based in Cooper Landing, AK where he makes his year-round home. He is a professional fly fishing guide and outfitter on both the Kenai and Kasilof Rivers on the Kenai Peninsula. David has a passion for teaching various fly fishing techniques and particularly enjoys spey casting. He spends upwards of 250-300 days a year guiding and swinging for salmon and trout on many of Alaska’s famed rivers. David is passionate about the #keepemwet movement and is excited for the future of fishing and stewardship of our resources.

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Introducing Keepemwet Fishing Endorsed Publications

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We are proud to introduce American Angler Magazine as the first Keepemwet Fishing Endorsed Publication.

Keepemwet Fishing Endorsed Publications pledge to publish images of catch-and-release fish that are in the water or dripping wet. Images and the representations of what catch-and-release angling looks like are foundations of the Keepemwet movement.

"We believe that setting good examples within angling media and social communities is essential for improving the norms of how catch-and-release  fish are photographed and handled." said Bryan Huskey, founder of Keepemwet Fishing. "Absolutely nothing is lost if anglers and photographers simply understand what science is telling us about C&R practices and how minor tweaks and awareness can have major impacts."

American Angler Editor Ben Romans explains "I’m happy to say American Angler is the first fly fishing publication to receive the Keepemwet endorsement. Going forward, I have to be more attuned to every detail of every image I publish, and at the same time, continue making a conscious effort to use images that portray anglers properly handling fish."

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Also embracing this effort and pledging to lead by example are digital and print magazines Swing The Fly and Catch Magazine. Swing the Fly Editor Zack Williams has long upheld stewardship as a pillar of the publication and explains "As anglers in an increasingly crowded world, we all have a responsibility to minimize our own impacts and leave our fisheries in better condition than we found them for future generations. Following the principles of Keepemwet Fishing is an incredibly easy way for us to do just that. It's really a no-brainer."

 Catch Magazine and Swing The Fly demonstrate leadership and commitment to angler education as they join the Keepemwet Fishing Endorsed Publication inaugral class.

Catch Magazine and Swing The Fly demonstrate leadership and commitment to angler education as they join the Keepemwet Fishing Endorsed Publication inaugral class.

"Catch Magazine has and always will publish photos and videos that reflect exactly the values Keepemwet believes in, and as a Keepemwet Fishing Endorsed Publication we take serious the responsibility to promote healthy and proper fish handling and fly fishing ethics to our worldwide audience." says Todd Moen, editor and co-founder of Catch Magazine.

As an organization, a movement and community Keepemwet Fishing welcomes and embraces any and all that are willing to take a look at the standards they've considered 'good enough' in the past and challenge themselves to be better. Keepemwet is not divisive, but rather a unifying effort working to engage and bridge angling culture and communities of all stripes. We welcome any and all that wish to start with small simple steps and lead by example.

Keepemwet Fishing believes that the path forward to effective conservation for recreational fisheries is through promoting a culture of education and embracing science-based evidence. We thank the publications, organizations, partners and individual anglers around the globe who are joining us in this effort.

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"If You're Gonna Let 'em Go..." C&R Trout

Keepemwet right?!  Many of us in the (in the Northern Hemisphere at least) are dreaming of warm summer breezes and perfect drifts into pods of wild trout sipping dry flies. How about a few other tips to keep in mind when the fish we target are not bound for the creel or cooler. 
Keepemwet Fishing founder Bryan Huskey shares a few tips and tactics for landing, handling and releasing the ones we hope to catch another day. 
Video by Will Bales. Music by Wrinkle Neck Mules

More scientifically sound tips can be found here on our Principles & Tips Pages.

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Ambassador Profile: Dr. Jake Brownscombe

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Jake is a research scientist that works on sportfish conservation through understanding how fish make a living, and developing catch-and-release angling practices that minimize our impacts on fish populations. From Largemouth Bass in Canadian lakes to Bonefish on the flats in The Bahamas, his research helps shape conservation minded angling practices. He works on recreational fisheries throughout the world, catching as many fish as he can along the way.

Dr. Brownscombe explains:

"Keepemwet is one of the most significant cultural movements in the world of angling today. It is showing anglers that keeping fish in the water when practicing catch-and-release is the key to having fish to catch tomorrow – and we can still get amazing photos. This is why I support the movement:
    Fishing has an important role to play in conservation. Anglers care about conserving fish and their habitats more than the average person, and we often push our weight around to preserve the resources we love. Yet, angling can be stressful for fish and have negative impacts on their populations if we aren’t careful about it. It is therefore essential to evolve our angling practices to ensure we contribute in a positive way to conservation.
    Research has shown that one of the greatest causes of stress and mortality in angled fish is air exposure. This is well known in the world of catch-and-release science, but not all anglers recognize this. Angling practices change through angling culture. Through movements like Keepemwet."

Jake Brownscombe, Ph.D.
Research Associate
Carleton University
Ottawa, Canada

Twitter and Instagram: @sci_angler

Research: researchgate.net/profile/Jacob_Brownscombe

 

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Ambassador Profile: Captain Tony DiGiulian

  Zac Yarbrough Photo

Zac Yarbrough Photo

What does Keepemwet mean to me?

It is a tremendous honor for me to be asked by Keepemwet Fishing to become part of such a distinguished and accomplished team of ambassadors, volunteers and corporate sponsors. I have been advocating for professional ethics and proper revive and release techniques for more than three decades. For me, “Keepemwet” is a life philosophy and is directly related to how we treat and respect not only our natural resources, but how we treat and respect other human beings as well. Ethical angling practices, professional responsibility and leadership go hand in hand. As fishermen and women, we are all responsible for protecting the resource we love and rely on so much. Being a professional and a leader in my industry, I feel I must set the highest ethical standards and example for others at all times, with no exceptions. As humans, we all have the ability to learn and evolve by keeping our minds open to new knowledge and scientific discovery. I am committed to the keepemwet mission of leading and educating others on the best way to enjoy all the joys fishing has to offer, while having the smallest negative impact on our fisheries. Please give the fish we catch and release, every opportunity to survive and spawn so that we can pass our blessings on to the next generation.

Anthony DiGiulian.

  Leonard Bryant Photography

Leonard Bryant Photography

Anthony “Tony” DiGiulian is President of Saltwater Professional Consulting. Tony started his career in 1979, aboard his Aunt and Uncle’s charter boat, out of Shinnecock Inlet, Long Island, N.Y. Working for over 38 years in the sport fishing industry as a professional Captain, deck hand, conservationist and consultant, he has led anglers to over 10,000 billfish captures worldwide, including several ultra-light world records and tournament victories.
A published author on various subjects related to sport fishing, Tony is a recognized expert on all types of saltwater fishing. His articles have been published in Sport Fishing Magazine, Marlin Magazine, Tournament Digest, IGFA International Angler, Billfish Magazine, fishtrack.com, In The Bite Magazine and Coastal Angler Magazine. He has been interviewed for numerous articles on fishing related topics by all the major fishing publications. You can view his many how to videos on You-Tube, IGFA.org and Fishtrack.com.


Tony has worked for some of the top sport fishing operations in the world and learned his craft from some of the most famous captains in history. The list includes legendary Captains: Skip Smith, Eddie Herbert, Rick Defeo, Daniel Timmons and Australian Laurie Wright. In 2006, Tony co-founded along with the International Game Fish Association (IGFA), the “IGFA School of Sportfishing”. In 2018 this program will be entering its twelfth year of existence. He also volunteers for all IGFA children’s programs and especially enjoys helping special needs children to experience the joys of fishing and being outdoors. Tony is a board member of “Fish To Make A Difference”, an organization that works with the Joe DiMaggio Children’s hospital to take children and their families, suffering with various health issues and life threatening diseases out on the water fishing.


In 2009 Tony started a project in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, where he guided his clients to the first rod and reel sword fish captures in Red Sea history. He is also responsible for the creation of The Red Sea Game Fishing Club and the Red Sea Game Fish Association. In addition Tony was the lead consultant and project manager in the creation of the first multi boat charter fishing operation in Saudi Arabia. In April of 2010, Tony was a guest professor at the prestigious King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, where he taught a three day course on fishing and the potentials of sport fishing as an industry on the Red Sea coast. In 2011 Tony was a guest speaker at the 2011 Asia Marine Conference at the 2011 South Korean International Boat Show, where he presented on the economics of the sport fishing and recreational angling industry. In 2012 he travelled to Egypt to begin a project in El Gouna, at the Abu Tig Marina with the end goal of bringing the sport fishing industry to Egypt’s resort coast on the Red Sea. In October of 2013, Tony was hired by the St. Lucia Game Fishing Association and the Southern Caribbean Billfish Circuit to begin a long term, multi-faceted project to promote that region as a top game fishing destination. Tony also created, produces and runs, the Sea Spray Abaco Challenge fishing tournament at the Sea Spray Resort in Elbow Cay, Abaco Bahamas.

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Mr. DiGiulian has always been committed to the sport fishing industry, but above all, has a deep desire to help preserve our marine environment and to protect the rights of the sport fishing public. Tony has been advocating for professional ethics, responsible use and proper fish handling and reviving techniques for three decades. Tony is an active member of The Billfish Foundation and a member of their Captains advisory board. In February of 2010, Tony was awarded the title of “Billfish Foundation Conservation Ambassador”, and is now representing TBF in an official capacity. Tony is an original member of the South East Swordfish Club, committee member of The Big Game Room at the Miami International Boat Show and committee member of the Jeb Bush Classic, Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Sailfish Tournament. Recently he has become the radio voice of the Yamaha/Contender Miami International Sportfish Tournament as that event’s on air scorekeeper.  He is a regular speaker at many fishing seminars and specializes in public speaking and organizing and conducting seminars for various organizations, including the National Marine Manufacturers Association (NMMA). His goal is to help boating and fishing enthusiast of all levels obtain the skills, information and technology necessary to maximize their overall saltwater experience.

 

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Russian River Coho - #knowyourcoho outreach campaign

The situation:
Locals noticed an uptick in people catching salmon in the Russian River during early winter this year, but that doesn’t necessarily mean that more adult fish were returning. It’s more likely because they were confined to the mainstem of the river due to lower-than-average seasonal flow conditions. Coho salmon and steelhead spawn in tributaries to the Russian River, so in years where there is just enough rain to allow adult fish to enter the river, but not enough water to allow access to their spawning grounds, they may be forced to hold in the river for several weeks until streams become open to adult passage. In water years like this, it is more important than ever to be conscious of the impact of fishing on these protected species.

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Concerned anglers will want to know that endangered coho are particularly vulnerable during periods of low flow during their spawning season. Anglers could easily catch one without intending to and, potentially, face penalties associated with harming them. Knowing how to identify coho salmon, steelhead, and Chinook is a critical skill for anyone fishing in the Russian River.

Please help us share information about this situation with the fishing community using the hashtag #knowyourcoho. The posts below are provided for convenience, or feel free to share your own.

Webpage: Know your salmon species to avoid catching endangered coho: http://go.ucsd.edu/2EbGFEA

ID Guide: Download a PDF Russian River Salmonid Identification Guide at: http://go.ucsd.edu/2F2x1p6

Avoid penalties and help restore the Russian River salmon fishery. Any time you catch a fish that looks like a salmon or steelhead:

Land the fish as quickly as possible

Have a rubber net ready for safe landing
Immediately check for an adipose fin. It will be intact on coho, wild steelhead, and Chinook. In order to avoid injuring or killing these protected fish:
Keep the fish in the water at all times – even if taking photos
Carefully remove your barbless hook and release the fish as quickly as possible
http://go.ucsd.edu/2EbGFEA
#knowyourcoho
#keepemwet

Hashtags: #knowyourcoho #keepemwet
Other related hashtags: #salmon #fishing #silver #coho #wild #catchandrelease #fishpicoftheday #salmonfishing #cohosalmon #angleredits #fishingphotography #outdoorlife #wildsalmon #wildriver #keepemwet #chinook #fortheloveofsalmon #fishing #russianriver

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Thoughts From John McMillan- Wild Steelhead of the OP

  No better way to start the new year than with a hen less than 100 yards from the ocean. And while I wish everyone a happy New Year, and some chrome this winter, I also want to raise awareness about the plight of Olympic Peninsula wild steelhead.

No better way to start the new year than with a hen less than 100 yards from the ocean. And while I wish everyone a happy New Year, and some chrome this winter, I also want to raise awareness about the plight of Olympic Peninsula wild steelhead.

By Keepemwet Fishing Science Ambassador John R McMillan

Populations of wild steelhead are in long-term decline in the Hoh, Queets and Quinalt. In fact, since 1980 (when they started collecting data on annual run sizes) populations of wild steelhead have declined by 33% in the Hoh and 48% in the Queets. The Quillayute system has fared a bit better, but it too has been in decline since the mid-90’s and it has experienced some of the smallest runs on record in recent years. In fact, just a couple years ago the Bogachiel escaped only 733 wild steelhead. That’s it, 733 fish. Last year was the smallest run size on record in the Queets, and the Hoh River steelhead have met the escapement goal less than 50% of the time in the past 15 years. That bad news: it looks like the trend will continue this winter. Managers estimate the run size will be only 7800 steelhead in the Quillayute, which includes the Bogachiel, Sol Duc, Calawah and Dickey Rivers. The forecast for the Hoh is a paltry 3,000 fish. Of further concern, ocean conditions don’t appear to be getting better in the next year or two, in fact, they may get even worse. During these poor return years it is incumbent upon anglers to play their part in conserving the fish. We, as anglers, are no longer harvesting wild steelhead in these streams. But, we are catching them, and catching them quite often. Data from 2014 in the Hoh indicates on average, every fish that escaped the tribal fishery was caught 1.44 times. And that is an underestimate, and does not include fish that were hooked and lost. Similar results were found in the Sol Duc. We don’t know what such high encounter rates do to wild steelhead. All I know is I love these fish. I love snorkeling with them. I love fishing for them. So, this year, my New Year’s resolution is to fish a bit less to give them a break, and make up some of that experience with snorkeling. It isn’t easy, but its better for the fish. 

John McMillan is the Science Director for Trout Unlimited's Wild Steelhead Initiative

Explore more of John's work here.

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Ambassador Profile: Jess McGlothiln

 Jess McGlothlin. Rob Yaskovik photo.

Jess McGlothlin. Rob Yaskovik photo.

“I’ve followed Keepemwet Fishing since its inception, and firmly believe this is an initiative the industry needs to get behind. Whether I’m teaching fishing photography workshops or shooting for commercial clients, the keepemwet principals apply — and photos of fish in situ are so much more interesting than the traditional ‘grip and grins’. I’m thrilled to be part of the Ambassador team and support this movement.”

"McGlothlin is as much a journalist as an angler, creating a visual with

words and images like a modern-day lady Hemingway." - Outdoor Hub

Jess McGlothlin sees her mission as a simple one: tell stories. Working as a freelance photographer and writer in the outdoor industry, while on assignment in the past few years she’s learned how to throw spears at coconuts in French Polynesia, dodge saltwater crocodiles in Cuba, stand-up paddleboard down Amazon tributaries and eat all manner of unidentifiable food. 

She is a passionate writer and photographer who brings a unique, energetic perspective and approach to her work. Her written word is bright, bold, and honest. Jess is a keen traveler and is available any time, any place for assignments.

Subject coverage ranges from Western rodeos to fly fishing far above the Arctic Circle in Russia. She has proven competence covering everything from international advertising campaigns to multi-day survival training sessions in remote, challenging environments to exploratory fishing trips. Her work has been featured in gallery shows from Germany to Israel, and she has received international awards / recognition for both her writing and photography.

Jess is available for contract, editorial, and assignment work, and is currently based in Bozeman, Montana, USA.

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